News
16 February 2021

Foundation contributes to support for small businesses in South Africa during the covid-pandemic

Aside from the number of infections, the socioeconomic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic are also huge in South Africa. During the COVID-19 pandemic, GEM initiated a project focussed on the development of innovative financial and socioeconomic tools in South Africa. The aim of the project is to help get the economic activity of small businesses started again during the pandemic.
News
2 February 2021

Zorg van de Zaak Foundation helps prevent massive corona contamination in Northeast India

In April 2020, the tea plantations in Assam (Northeast India) were immediately high risk areas for the spread of the coronavirus. Most of the workers work and live in close proximity to each other. Water-wells, where a lot of people are present at the same time, are used everywhere. Additionally, during rain season (April to September), high humidity makes it easier for diseases to spread.
News
15 January 2021

Over 200 food packages catered with Zorg van de Zaak Foundation Christmas project

With this Christmas project, a total of 410 euros was raised! As a result, over 200 food packages were catered to the pregnant women working on the plantations. Over 200 families were provided with a high quality food package. As a result, apart from the women themselves, their babies were also aided in making a good, healthy start.
News
30 December 2020

Coup Cura at work on 5 schools in North Brabant

For the Foundation, the work of Coup Cura is a new, promising way of making stigmas around addiction possible to discuss, and through discussing them, breaking them down. ‘Addiction is ignored too often.’ Says Frans Werter of the Zorg van de Zaak Foundation. ‘It is downplayed and people prefer not to discuss it, both in families and at work. Due to this sort of stigma, problems build and people can end up in the illness benefit system.’
News
18 December 2020

Together in a new way

And then, everything was suddenly different. In March of this year, The Netherlands were locked, and it seemed as though everybody was mainly dependent on themselves. There were various forms of support and financial assistance, but the future became uncertain for everybody. The same thing happened to many of the partners we work with all over the world. For instance, the ‘lockdown’ led to people being unable to sell their merchandise on markets in Kenya, Burundi, Bolivia, and South Africa. We watched with sad eyes as governments tried to impede the spread of the virus, resulting in more people collapsing due to hunger. This is a dilemma which we would rather not have seen in practice.
News
9 December 2020

Extra support for pregnant women and children on the tea plantations of Northeast India

Over 8 months after the start of the pandemic, the first ‘corona’ generation is here. Newly born children in Asia, Africa and South America are dealing directly with the effects of increased poverty. The growth and development of children’s brains is limited without proper nourishment in the first 3 years of their lives. Therefore, Zorg van de Zaak Foundation put in extra work last December to support women and children in India with food packages. This was a Christmas activity we organize as a part of an existing project in collaboration with the Indian Tea Association (ITA).
News
14 November 2020

Social involvement is for everyone

Marius Touwen initiated the establishment of Zorg van de Zaak Foundation in 2014. ‘Over five years later, the Foundation has achieved a lot, but there is a lot to do in the world. ‘I understand that some people are now giving up hope, but if everyone does that, it’s the beginning of the end.
News
9 November 2020

ICT courses help Congo youths get a job

Without ICT skills, young people have a hard time developing in this world, and the same goes for Congo. Many students at (applied) universities in Congo’s capital Kinshasa mainly follow theoretical courses: practical lessons are lacking. They do not have the opportunity to develop their ICT skills, because there is hardly any material available. At one of the universities, there are only 30 to 40 computers for 4000 students, causing the students to have little opportunity to put their theoretical knowledge into practice. For this reason, project ‘Livingstone Bantu’ was initiated: a project which offers ICT courses to young people, in order to increase their chances on the labour market.